The Last Guy on Flickr

Did something last week that I know most of you will think is crazy: I bought two more years on Flickr. Trust me, I think it’s pretty crazy, too.

I used Instagram for a while, but I realized those pics are trapped in an ecosystem that’s just as complicated as Flickr, but without sets and at much lower resolution.

Privacy is important, too. Flickr offers me options. I don’t need to broadcast everything. If I want to share, I’ll twitpic and be done with it. Filters are nice, but a bit gimmicky and square photos have meant that more than one great image of my son crops his head off when I try to print. Bummer, that.

To top it off, I have a ton of photos hosted on Flickr, going back six years. Do I wish I’d snagged my real name instead of my ’00s alias? Yes, but they’re memories, no matter how silly the permalink.

Am I afraid of what might happen in the near future at Flickr? Of course. The Delicious spinoff went about as badly as possible. But I have to believe that Flickr can be adapted to a more social mobile experience that still delivers what people loved about the service when they first bought a pro account. At least I hope so.

So ‘fess up: who still uses and enjoys Flickr? Let’s connect!

Unfollowing Is Hard

One of my digital New Year’s Resolutions was to “go pro” on Twitter. I’m nearly there and I can tell you it’s not easy. For me it’s meant unfollowing and plugging folks into lists or just disconnecting altogether in order to pay attention to things that are, you know, work-related. In some cases it means severing ties with old co-workers, high school classmates and vibrant locals in exchange for national and regional media, current co-workers and influencers. It’s a window into their process, something that wouldn’t have been possible a decade ago, and it’s more important to my work than ever. Thing is, has this transformation sucked all the fun out of Twitter and Facebook? Continue reading

Cleaning Digital House

Happy New Year! Make any resolutions? One of mine is to streamline participation on certain types of social media. In 2012, I don’t want to feel like I’m doing data entry when I’m trying out a new app; I want social sharing to be fun and open-ended.

I caught this link on The Verge yesterday and took less than two minutes revoking permissions across my preferred social media platforms. Found services that I maybe used once in 2008 still had access to my info! Crazy, right?

Part of not feeling like a data mule is knowing what you’re sharing and with whom. Folks often think that cutting back on joining new services is what matters, but think about all the services you grant access to your Twitter, Facebook and Google accounts. Go look and see for yourself. It’s a little scary.

Now, I love new toys as much as the next guy, but it’s important to be mindful of those permissions. I have no idea how many user agreements I’ve signed online, but I’m sure it’s too many. Stay on top of those items and you’ll do well to lead a cleaner life online in 2012.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to get back to deleting notification emails…